If there is a chance the applicants and the owners could come together, it would mean that the Channel7 building could be re-used. Something else could still be built on the rest of the property, and it could be even taller.

Call it horse-trading, but it was not totally kumbaya. However: From the beginning, the three people want to save the Channel7 building to undergo adaptive re-use. Save the exterior, and figure out a new interior for a new use.  The Land Use, Transportation and Infrastructure Committee met Tuesday to decide whether the Channel7 octagonal building …

When people stand up to remember dark times, such as Amache, the World War II internment camp is getting more support in Congress from two Colorado representatives. The push began in 2006, so…

MCA Denver was located in a renovated fish market in Sakura Square, before there was land donated for the museum on Delgany Street. Visiting the museum in Sakura Square was great because it was in a part of Denver that had a special meaning. What intrigued me was a bust of Governor Ralph Carr, who …

Learning from others is important, especially when Latino and Chicano residents know their history in Denver — and today.

This past Saturday morning, Denver’s Community Planning and Development (CPD) held a Zoom meeting, and about 70 people were online.  The idea was to come up with information to bolster history, like how Latino and Chicano residents came to Denver and how they created their neighborhoods, and how they struggled for their rights and dignity. …

David and Goliath can continue to discuss the future of the Channel7 building, but then when it goes to city council, do you want a building — or a plaque?

Yesterday’s Denver Landmark Preservation Commission meeting had a strange vibe when it came to the public hearing involving a tower at 123 Speer Boulevard. An owner-opposed application is always a long haul, and when the owner has the ability and wealth to seek support, the process can become less than pleasant. Of course, going to …

Those with no housing in Denver suffer, especially as the rents and prices have ballooned. But this is not new.

In the early years of Denver, having no housing was bad, and much worse. A two-part piece titled Homeless in Denver was in the newsletter for the Denver Public Library Western History and Genealogy Department. The author is Alex Hernandez, a reference librarian in that department -- and the beginning is beyond bleak. (This department, which …

No, this photograph is not a mistake, but the scooters seem to be in a tug-of-war. Because something is missing.

Yesterday, Denver’s Land Use, Transportation & Infrastructure Committee received more information from the Department of Transportation and Infrastructure, or DOTI, to help the city council representatives on the committee to push it along to the full council. But that did not happen; the next meeting about the scooter situation will be on Tuesday, April 27.  …

Why is it that developers or owners decide to submit the most totally crummy photographs in Denver’s application to tear a building down?

Perhaps, it’s because those who deal with the city’s Certificate of Demolition Eligibility process and their application submissions should be replaced by another apartment building? After all, submitting the kill-the-building application costs $250, while the three people who must cough up $875 because they are not owners of the building/s. An owner who wants to have …

Remember the pussy hats? Even before that pink wave, the concept of knitting somehow got political.

This has been a sad and horrible week, difficult to sleep, stop watching the news about a massacre, and why so many guns. It seemed absolutely correct to stay up late last night to read The New Yorker. This is the Style & Design Issue, which is always dreamy, even though many of us are in …

Call it a re-run, but it holds up after almost a year: We still want to see the mountains.

“The concept of a view plane was codified about 70 years ago in an ordinance by the City and County of Denver, preserving the views of the mountains to the west. They serve as a backdrop for beauty, and for residents and visitors who love those views. Driving into Denver from the east to move …